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ZOO401 FINAL TERM PAST PAPERS MEGA FILES

ZOO401:  Limnology Past Papers

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ZOO401 FINAL TERM PAST PAPERS MEGA FILES
ZOO401 FINAL TERM PAST PAPERS MEGA FILES

ZOO401: Limnology

Limnology:

Limnology is a study of inland water ecosystems. Limnology can be defined in a number of ways, but it is important to note that the discipline includes research into both freshwater and inland saltwater. This includes research into lakes, dams, lakes, rivers, springs, streams, wetlands, and groundwater. This may also include research on the drainage system, the flow of water in the barrel and the biogeochemical changes that occur along the way.

Limnology is traditionally closely related to hydrobiology, which deals with the application of the principles and methods of physics, chemistry, geology, and geography to environmental problems.

Goals Of Limnology:

One of the most important objectives of limnology is to provide guidelines for water management and water pollution control. Limnologists are also exploring ways to protect the wildlife that live in lakes and rivers as well as lakes and rivers themselves. Some limnologists work to build artificial wetlands, which can serve as a habitat for species and help reduce water pollution.

The most recent sub-discipline of limnology, called landscape limnology, studies, manages and seeks to conserve these natural areas using landscape theory, by explicitly exploring the link between the aquatic ecosystem and its aquifer. Recently, the need to understand the inland waters as part of the Global Plan has created a sub-discipline called global limnology.

Fresh Water Ecology:

Freshwater ecology is the study of the relationship between the structure and function of freshwater organisms as they are influenced by their biological, chemical, and biotic properties.

Fresh Water Biology:

Freshwater biology is the study of biological features and interactions of freshwater organisms. This research is limited to living things themselves, such as their biology, life history, population, or, from time to time, communities.

Arctic Lake Ecosystems:

Limnology focuses on lake design and geomorphology, as well as lake physics, chemistry, and biology. Of the more than 75 documented methods of lake construction, the Arctic contains examples of almost all of those processes and certainly the lakes formed by large sections of volcanic, ice, and tectonic forces. But one unique feature of arctic pools is the role of thermokarst processes, which contribute to the formation of the world’s largest lakes. These shallow pools are built inside the ice-wedge polygons or in the melting of low-lying ice to form thermokarst pools.

Geological Limnology:

Geological limnology focuses on the construction of lakes and rivers. Many lakes, especially in North America, are formed by receding icebergs (slow ice caps) at the end of the Ice Age. As the glaciers melted, they pierced holes in the soft parts of the solid rock. When these wells filled with water, they became fools. Some lakes form when tectonic plates (moving pieces of the Earth’s crust) separate, leaving cracks called grabens. When the cracks are flooded, very deep lakes may form.

Biological Limnology:

Biological limnology is aimed at understanding animals, plants, and microorganisms that live in lakes and rivers. The distribution patterns of this biodiversity depend on the geology, physics, and chemistry of the lake or river. For example, plants need light in order to grow. Because water is highly efficient in absorbing light, plants should grow close to shore, where water is shallow or must float near water.

Physical Limnology:

Physical limnology is about water structures in lakes and rivers. This includes changes in light levels, water temperatures, and currents. Water absorbs the sun’s energy, which warms the surface water.

Physical Properties:

The natural structures of aquatic life are determined by a combination of temperature, currents, waves, and other distribution of seasonal conditions. The morphometry of a body of water depends on the nature of the element (such as a lake, river, stream, wetland, river, etc.) and the earth’s structure around the body of water. Lakes, for example, are separated by their shape, and the location of the lakes is defined by the depth of the water. The morphometry of the river system and streams is driven by the basic geology of the area and the normal speed of the water.

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ZOO401: Limnology Past Papers

 

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