CS402 HANDOUTS | Theory of Automata

CS402 HANDOUTS

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CS402: Theory of Automata Handouts

Course Category: Computer Science/Information Technology

Course Outline

Languages, Kleen Closure, Recursive Definitions, Regular Expressions, Finite and Infinite languages, Regular Languages, NonRegular Languages, Finite Automata with output, Finite Automata and their languages, Transition Graphs, Nondeterminism, NonRegular Languages, The Pumping Lemma, Context Free Grammars, Tree, Ambiguity, Pushdown Automata, Decidability.

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CS402 Handouts
CS402 Handouts

CS402 HANDOUTS 

CS402: Theory of Automata

Automata theory is a branch of computer science and mathematical theory. It is a study of invisible machines and computational problems that can be solved using these machines. An invisible machine is called an automata. The main motivation for developing automata theory was to develop methods to explain and analyze the dynamic behavior of different systems.

This automaton contains regions and transitions. The country is represented by circles, and Changes are represented by arrows.

Automata is a type of machine that takes a unit of character as input and this input exceeds a limited number of regions and can enter the final state.

Automata theory is closely related to systematic language theory. In this context, automata is used as a limited presentation for non-stop official languages. Automata is often classified into the category of official languages ​​they can identify, as in the Chomsky category, which describes the settlement relationship between the major automata categories. Automata plays a major role in arithmetic theory, compiler design, performance intelligence, analysis and formal validation.

The theory of invisible automata was developed in the mid-20th century with regard to finite automata. Automata theory was initially considered a branch of mathematical system theory, studying the behavior of systems of different parameters. Preliminary work on automata theory differs from previous systems work by using invisible algebra to describe information systems instead of divisive calculations to describe material systems. The theory of finite-state transducer was developed under different names by different research communities. The original concept of Turing machines has also been incorporated into training and new infinite-state automaton techniques, such as pushdown automata.

Informal Definition

The automaton starts when given a sequence of inputs with different (individual) steps or steps. Automaton processes one input in a set of symbols or characters, called the input alphabet. The symbols acquired by the automaton as input into any step are a sequence of symbols called names.

The automaton has a set of conditions. Each time the automaton operates, the automaton is in one of its regions. When an automaton acquires a new input it moves to another state (or changes) based on the function change that takes the previous position and the current input mark as parameters. At the same time, another function called the output function produces symbols from the outgoing letters, and depending on the previous status and the current input mark. The automaton reads the input word symbols and switches between regions until the word is read altogether, if it is limited in length, when the automaton stops. The state in which an automaton stands is called the final state.

In order to investigate the possible sequence of input / output / output on an automated machine using official language theory, the machine can be given the initial status and set of reception conditions. Then, depending on the run from the initial state to the receiving state, the automaton can be said to accept or reject the input sequence. The set of all the words accepted by an automaton is called an automaton recognized language. A typical example of an electronic voice detector is an electronic lock that accepts or rejects attempts to enter valid code.

CS402 HANDOUTS

CS402 HANDOUTS

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CS402: Theory of Automata Handouts

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